Archive for the ‘Sights’ Category

Guide to Sailing in Majorca

Posted on: June 15th, 2016 by admin No Comments

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Mallorca is a beautiful place to go sailing at almost any time of year. Benefiting from the warm climate of the Balearic Islands, which also provides superb sailing winds, Mallorca possesses dramatic coastlines, secluded coves and excellent harbour facilities for sailors.While the ideal time to sail around Mallorca is May to October, when the warm summer sun and light breezes offer prefect conditions. This does, however, mean that the seas can be crowded at this time of year. Those visitors who prefer a less populated ocean may well prefer to visit during the winter or spring. The weather is still good for sailing during the winter months, and the Mediterranean region remains relatively warm, though it is necessary to take more notice of weather conditions and react accordingly at this time of year.

Many of the island’s bays and coves are well protected from harsher weather, providing an excellent environment for new sailors to learn in, and practice their skills. Due to the island’s geography, and the direction of prevailing winds, dangerous swells are rarely experienced by sailors who keep in relatively close to the shoreline.

Mallorca has 544km shoreline to explore, and there are many fine bays and harbours in which to anchor. Porto Cristo provides sailors with a very large marina and an easy anchorage in a sandy seafloor. The water is beautifully clear and perfect for swimming. If a visitor wants to spend some time soaking up the sun on a sandy beach while ashore, then anchoring at Colonia Sant Jordi is a good idea. Here, amidst the calm waters of the south east corner of the island, are located some of Mallorca’s finest beaches, in the shape of Ets Estanys, Es Trenc, Es Dolc and Es Carbo.

Of course, people do not just go on holiday for the sailing, and Port d’Andratx, on the island’s south western corner, has some fine bars and restaurants overlooking its marina. Just up the coast from there is the resort of Sant Elm, which, as well as its nightlife, is a gateway to the Natural Park of Sa Dragonera.

Overall, Mallorca is a superb choice of destination for the seasoned or novice sailor. Its gentle climate, beautiful coastline and excellent waters, as well as its onshore hospitality, make it one of the jewels of the Balearics.

Historic Buildings of Palma de Majorca

Posted on: May 28th, 2016 by admin No Comments

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Historic Buildings of Palma de Majorca

The beautiful capital city of Majorca, Palma de Majorca, overlooks the Mediterranean Sea and is home to a wonderful collection of spectacular buildings that boast some of the most astounding architecture in Europe.The city’s landmark is the magnificent La Seu, a Gothic cathedral located in the old quarter. The foundation stone was laid in 1230 by King James I of Aragon and work continued for the next 400 years. Following an earthquake, work was resumed in 1851 and as a result, the building has features from many different periods of history. In 1909, a wrought-iron candelabra, designed by the famous architect Gaudi, was erected over the main altar. It is also home to one of the world’s largest stained glass windows that was made from 1,236 pieces of glass and measures an impressive 12m across. Dedicated to San Sebastian, Palma’s patron saint, this masterpiece is a sight not to be missed.

Opposite the cathedral stands the immense Almudaina Palace. Built in the thirteenth-century, it was originally an Arab fortress and housed members of the Spanish Royal Family throughout the fourteenth-century. Elements of Islamic architecture can still be found with its Moorish arches, but it was later converted to demonstrate Gothic architecture. Surrounded by the stunning S’Hort des Rei gardens, exploring the grounds is a great way to spend a sunny afternoon.

Built in 1309, Bellver Castle is situated on top of a hill and offers some of the most outstanding panoramic views of the city below. The unique structure is entirely circular and features both Moorish and Romanesque features. For many centuries it was used as a prison, but now houses the city’s History Museum where Roman, Spanish and Arab artefacts can be found.

The Arab Baths, located in the mediaeval quarter, is all that remains of the Moorish city of Medina Mayurqa, which was what Palma was once known as. Dating back to the tenth-century, this ancient building features a domed room that was once used for relaxation purposes. Spend an afternoon exploring the grounds and be sure to visit the courtyard for a much-needed break from the hustle and bustle of hectic city life.

For more modern architecture, visit the old Gran Hotel. Opened in 1903, this breathtaking building is now home to the city’s most popular art gallery and many different exhibitions can be found here throughout the year. The sculptured façade, the intricate tiling, the ornate iron railings and the huge stone carvings make this building a wonder to behold.

Walking in Majorca

Posted on: April 8th, 2016 by admin No Comments

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Walking Mallorca; the Mediterranean’s gem

From pristine coastline to magnificent mountain ranges, Mallorca’s natural beauty is fast attracting keen walkers, and finding its way onto the ‘to do’ list of many more. Still, though, Mallorca remains a largely undiscovered paradise for outdoor enthusiasts, offering quiet trails, great scenery and close contact with nature. Mallorca’s best known trails are concentrated in Mallorca’s two mountain ranges – the Serra de Llevant in the East, and the Tramuntana range in the West. These two unspoilt areas have avoided the trappings of mass tourism, protected not just by the nature of their terrain but also government protection including national park status.

Mallorca offers walking experiences for all abilities, from gentle town and village walks to longer distance hikes. For cliffs and coastal views, the ‘Atalaya de Alcudia’ route is hard to beat, beginning in S’illot on Mallorca’s Easterly coast, gaining height to reach the Atalaya from where spectacular views are possible, before descending to Bon Aire through pine forest. Another highlight of the East is the Cala Torta route to Cala Rajada; expect Mediterranean flowers and scents in Spring.

If it’s peaks you seek, the Sa Retata ridge is an unbeatable choice, with three in store on this circular route. The views are, naturally, panoramic, and offer particularly good views of the islands interior reservoirs. The first viewpoint, L’Ofre, is noted for it’s distinctive cone shape, from where the route continues to Na Francesca and the sparse Sa Retata. Too, the Pilgrim’s Steps walk to the Lluc Monastery offers height on what is Mallorca’s most popular walk. A monastery is also on the menu on the ‘Sa Trapa’ route from the South-Western village S’Aracco.

The list of fantastic walks and possibilities on Mallorca is endless, so it’s lucky Mallorca is a true all year round destination. With mild, only occasionally cold winters, a warm Spring and Summer, and a relatively dry Autumn, the time is always right in Mallorca. Plus, travelling off-season offers additional peace and tranquillity, quiet accommodation, and lower prices. Whilst car hire offers additional flexibility, good public transport (including Mallorca’s famous histoirc railways) means Mallorcan walks are remarkably easily accessible.

5 Reasons To See Majorca By Road

Posted on: February 10th, 2016 by admin No Comments

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Take the car and explore Majorca’s hidden gems

Hiring a car and going on a road trip is an exciting way to see the nooks and crannies of somewhere new. Take a road trip around Majorca and take in incredible views, artisan markets and quaint villages with traditional restaurants.

Spend time exploring Majorca by car and you can:

1. Shop at a street market. Manacor is on the east side of Majorca and is the second largest town on the island. It is well-known for pearls and there are factories where visitors can go on a tour and see the production of pearl jewellery from start to finish. Along the streets of Manacor, two weekly markets are held – a local food market is open every Monday and an artisan market takes place each Saturday.

2. Sit by an underground lake. Head towards the town of Porto Cristo and you will find Coves Del Drach, some of the most incredible caves in Europe. The lit walkways take you past stalactites and stalagmites and onto a lake where they play peaceful music in a unique atmosphere.

3. Witness breath taking views. A drive along the coast from Palma to Deia reveals dazzling vistas across the Mediterranean Sea and the rolling countryside. The road gets a little hairy in some places, but the rewards are worth it. Stop a while at Valldemossa which has a church with a spire and terraced hillsides. Continue further along the coastline and you will reach the tiny village of Deia which is a favourite spot for A-list movie stars who want to get away from it all. As you wander the twisting backstreets look out for famous faces hidden behind large-framed sunglasses.

4. Tuck into to something different. Stop at cafes, restaurants and bars which offer traditional Spanish dishes and local wine. There a many places to stop along the roadside where you will get to try something new. Choose a place to eat with wide views in the countryside or fresh seafood next to the Mediterranean.

5. Explore the Tramuntana Mountain range. Enjoy cooler air by car by driving the M10 through Lluc and onto the Bay of Alcudia. Along the way you can spot sheep, goats, almond trees and olive groves. This area is a favourite with hikers, so if you can park up, get out to take in the fresh mountain air.

Sailing in Majorca – Balearic Bliss

Posted on: February 3rd, 2016 by admin No Comments

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One of the best ways to see all of the beauty that Majorca has to offer is on a sailing trip. While relaxing on deck you can soak up the warm sun and view the island from a whole new perspective. Sailing round the coast will show you the true variety of landscapes found on Majorca, from palm-fringed beaches to bustling fishing ports, tiny coastal villages and towering cliffs. Day trips are an ideal way to sample some of these hidden delights, but yacht charters are also widely available if you’d like to spend more time out on the waves.

Majorca is well known for its stunning beaches, many of which are not easily accessible from inland. A sailing trip allows you to visit remote and hidden coves, so you can enjoy some peace and tranquillity away from the busy tourist areas. Cala Boquer, on the north-west coast, is one such spot – only accessible on foot or by boat.

If you enjoy a more active holiday, most sailing trips will offer opportunities for swimming and snorkelling. Other water activities, such as water-skiing and wakeboarding may also be available. Fishing is another popular option, with a wide variety of fish found in local waters – including giant swordfish and bluefin tuna, which pass through at the end of summer.

The position of the Balearic Islands means that Majorca enjoys ideal conditions for sailing much of the time, particularly during the summer months. Reliable breezes and sheltered coves make the island an excellent spot for beginner sailors to learn some new skills. Port de Pollenca, on the north-west coast, is well-known as an excellent spot for this.

A sailing trip is also a wonderful way to see more of the local wildlife. Dolphins are regular visitors to the surrounding waters and keen birdwatchers will enjoy spotting the many different sea birds found in the area. In the south-east of the island is Colonia St Jordi, where boats trips can be taken to the Cabrera Archipelago, a collection of 19 islands that form a national park where lots of great wildlife can be seen, both on land and in the water.

Sailing trips are widely available and set out from many different ports all around the island, so wherever you’re based there’s sure to be at least one within easy driving distance.

The 5 Best Beaches in Majorca

Posted on: June 3rd, 2015 by admin No Comments

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Cala Deià, near Sóller

One of the few beaches situated on the rugged west coast of Majorca, its pebbles and coarse sand are sheltered by cliffs and pine forests. The beauty and special light quality of Cala Deià are celebrated by artists, who set up on the terraces above the secluded rock pools. The clear water is ideal for snorkelling and swimming – writer Robert Graves once lived nearby and visited the little cove for a daily dip.

Playa de Muro, near Alcudia

For something completely different, head for the north coast and its miles of golden sands. Watersports enthusiasts will love Playa de Muro, which boasts excellent facilities and disabled access. Edged by pine and juniper trees and backed by dunes, this Blue Flag resort is close to the Albufera nature reserve, the island’s largest wetland expanse. With its shallow waters and hotels opening on to the beach, the bay is perfect for families and young children.

Cala Torta, near Artà

If the thought of turquoise-blue sea and fine white sand makes you happy, choose the north-east side of the island. The intermittently windy conditions of Torta make it popular with surfers, and its deep crystal-clear water attracts snorkellers. You can strip off or not, as you prefer, as this destination is laid-back but not designated as solely a nudist area. Reach it by way of a bumpy car ride and a walk through the dunes.

Es Trenc

Make for the more sheltered south coast for this well-known strip with a Caribbean feel. Despite its isolation the natural beauty of this resort-free location attracts crowds, but in this protected zone you’ll find solitude among the sand dunes, tamarind trees and wetlands, home to marine vegetation and migratory birds. Windsurfing is the main activity, with facilities including lifeguards and disabled ramps, while others will appreciate its tradition as an unofficial nudist beach.

Ciutat Jardí or Ciudad Jardín, Palma

Combine the history, Art Nouveau architecture, elegant shops and general buzz of Majorca’s capital with breath-taking views of the Bay of Palma from this appropriately-named city garden. Stroll or cycle along the promenade as far as Arenal or act cool on rollerblades. The shallow sea is safe for small children who will also appreciate the large playground, while the extensive facilities on offer will suit families, with disabled members well catered for.

Take a hike! The most breathtaking places for a hike in Majorca.

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by admin No Comments

There’s More to Majorca Than You Think
Majorca is widely perceived in the UK as a family holiday spot or a party destination, but once you get outside of the built-up resorts, you’ll be amazed by dramatic cliffs, deserted coves, and the lovely Serra de Tramuntana, a UNESCO World Heritage site in the “Cultural Landscape” category.

While in Majorca, make your life easy with your own set of wheels: hiring a car at Majorca Airport means you’ll have the independence to really explore the island for yourself.


Breathtaking Views
Puig de Massanella, standing proud at 1367 metres tall, is the island’s second highest peak, and it’s praised by Lonley Planet for its beautiful Alpine-style slopes and incredible panoramas.

There are many locally-based island companies who can help you find the right trek according to your levels of ability and adventure, with trails such as that of Banyalbufar ranked easy (it incorporates a wine excursion!) right up to the challenging” 3-hour climb up the slopes of Puig Galatzó.

Be Independent
If you feel more like striking out on your own, many local companies can offer lots of advice on places to hike. The walk from Camp de Mar to Sa Mola takes in delightful coastal views, a gorgeous beach, and a sunny fishing village. Following an 11km route, you can finish the day with a fresh, local seafood dinner in Port d’Andratx.

Port d'Andratx - Majorca
For something a little more strenuous, the Dry Stone Route around the western coast of Majorca is a popular 8-day trek. This 135km hike through the mountains includes hostels en route for tired walkers, and starts at Port d’Andratx, finishing at Pollenca.

Adventure lovers can also enjoy kayaking, caving, rock climbing, scuba diving, canyoning, and mountain biking on Majorca- it’s a perfect place for outdoor types, with a pleasing subtropical climate and lush green vegetation. While mountain treks are better avoided in the hotter months, hikers will find the off-season to be a more favourable time of year: accommodation is cheaper, the weather is cooler, and the summer crowds are nowhere to be seen. Perfect.

Ballooning in Majorca

Posted on: February 26th, 2015 by admin No Comments

Ballooning in Majorca

Taking a hot air balloon ride is one of the most magical ways to see all that Majorca has to offer. Ballooning in Majorca will give you a bird’s eye view of the stunning island and will enjoy an experience that they will never forget. People who have a real head for heights are treated to stunning panoramic views of the entire island as well as the surrounding area as they drive slowly through the air.

It’s best to start your ballooning adventure at dawn, this way you’ll get a chance to watch an impressive sunrise in a unique new way. As the balloon climbs slowly higher to reach 500 metres you will be greeted by the enchanting sight of the sun sparkling on the Mediterranean Sea, painting it with a broad spectrum of colours.

The impressive Serra de Tramuntana mountain range can be seen far below, and this is the perfect way to admire the mountains of Majorca in all their glory. The endless golden sandy beaches that surround the island can really be appreciated from this high and at this time in the morning there are few people stretched out on the sand.

Your balloon gently drifts across the island until it is directly over the table mountain of Puig de Randa. This mighty mountain is 542 metres high and can be admired from all parts of Majorca. However, taking a balloon ride gives visitors the unique opportunity to see the whole of the mountain from a lofty vantage point.

If the weather conditions are good, you will be able to see all the way to the island of Cabera in the distance. The ride is so slow and gentle that it almost feels as those you are gliding through the clouds as you take in the spectacular sights below and all around you.

This is an extremely romantic experience and taking a hot air balloon ride in Majorca is particularly popular among young lovers. As you touch down at the end of the balloon ride you will feel exhilarated and energised. Now it is time to enjoy a delicious Mediterranean breakfast before exploring Majorca’s other impressive experiences.

The Top 5 Museums and Art Galleries in Majorca

Posted on: January 8th, 2015 by admin No Comments

Museums and Art Galleries

For those seeking an alternative experience of the largest Balearic island to the usual partying and sun worship, Majorca has a wide range of museums and art galleries to choose from.

1. Museu de la Mar
The Museu de la Mar, or the Port of the Sea, is situated at the Port de Sóller and is a celebration of that port’s maritime history. The museum resides within a medieval chapel, the Oratorio de Santa Caterina, and showcases a range of seafaring memorabilia in respect and remembrance of the settlement’s centuries old reliance on the sea for survival.

2. CCA Andratx Art Centre
The CCA Andratxt Art Centre is a must see for admirers of post-modern creativity. On showcase are a variety of artistic mediums, including installation, sculptures, paintings and photographs. Located in Andratx, near Palma, this gallery displays exquisite artworks from Spanish as well as international artists.

3. Museu de Fang (Majorcan pottery museum)
The Museu de Fang, or the Clay Museum, contains examples of Balearic pottery with an emphasis on local Majorcan items. This museum, housed in an old windmill, serves as a reminder of the thriving local pottery industry that has existed here for centuries. It is both an art gallery and a museum, in its way, because the often functional objects on display are works of art as well as cultural and historical artifacts.

4. Casal Solleric
Located in Palma, capital of Majorca and the Balearics, this art gallery resides within a magnificent 18th century baroque building and exhibits contemporary paintings and photography. Visitors may enjoy the contrast between the historical setting and the contemporary exhibits.

5. Es Revellar Art Resort Galleries
This art gallery resides in the magnificent Es Revellar estate, located in the municipality of Campos and dating from the 15th century. Serving as both a hotel and an art gallery, it practices the concept of land art, that is the use of beautiful surroundings to induce pleasant emotions. Works of art including sculptures as well as multicultural and historical artifacts melt into exquisite gardens and gorgeous stone villas.

Stunning Natural Views – Majorca’s Nature Parks

Posted on: October 2nd, 2014 by admin No Comments

Majorca’s Nature Parks

Check out the Majorca’s nature parks and discover naturalistic delights and surprises, with spectacular landscapes to enchant the eye and the spirit.

S’Albufera Nature Reserve
S’Albufera bird sanctuary in North East Majorca accommodates over 200 species of birds, including the giant cormorant and the fisher eagle. There are 400 species of flora here and eels abound in the waterways. Officially declared a Special Protection Area for Birds in 1987, it is the most significant wetlands area in the Balearic Islands.

S’Albufereta de Pollensa Nature Reserve
This lovely spot in the Alcudia area on the Es Grau estuary acts as stopping and nesting grounds for migrating birds such as the yellow wagtail and the purple gallinute. Visitors must keep to the main coast road as much of the park is private property.

The Llevant Peninsula
This hilly peninsula covered in shrub and heather in the North East is ideal for hiking and bird-watching. Hiking trails lead you to the splendid views from the hilltop. It is possible to stay overnight in a mountain refuge. These hills encompass diverse habitats, including pyrophytic (fire-resistant) flora.

Mondrago
Mondrago, in the South East, is an extraordinary mix of wetlands, which attract migratory birds, and white sandy beaches, which attract tourists. There is room for all! The Mediterranean tortoise was successfully reintroduced into this remarkable marine environment; the sea here is the colour of sparkling sapphires.

The Cabrera Archipelago Maritime-Terrestrial National Park
This archipelago off the South coast, ten kilometres from Cape Salinas, lies in transparent uncontaminated waters. These islands, with typical Mediterranean vegetation and sea pines, annually host roughly 130 species of migratory birds. The protected marine area accommodates turtles, whales and rare fish species in underwater caves.

Sa Dragonera
This small uninhabited island covered in olive groves lies off the South West coast of Majorca. Gulls and cormorants nest on the high cliffs on the North side, including Andouin’s gulls which are a protected species. The crystal sea, the sea bed dotted with coral and flourishing marine life, attracts snorkelers and scuba divers. The indigenous ‘wall lizard’, the Sargantana, is found only here.